Walking in New York

I did not expect it – New York as a treasure box for beauty! Skyscrapers disappear into the mist, disappear into undefined, mysterious space. In the deep canyons made out of buildings, brilliant yellow leaves  of  rows of ginko and acacia trees illuminate the streets down below and paint the sidewalks with happy dots of colours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A person cleaning the street of fallen leaves in front of a shop.  The huge building is the MET.

 

 

 

 

The windows of the shops like Gucci are like temporary art exhibitions. They smile towards the viewer with cool elegance, pretending to not want to lure the people into the shop. Each of the windows is a piece of art. There is a playfulness in the windows, which makes the viewer smile back.

 

 

 

Yves St. Laurent window

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The world seems to be a perfect world in the streets of Manhattan,  where poverty does not exist. However, especially in front of the Trump Tower, one sees that the wealth has to do with power, which has to be protected.

 

 

 

 

 

Patty and I with one of the guardians in front of Trump tower. Inside the tower, the golden walls with the letter T – which show up in every corner – reflect the light and make the walls look like they are on fire. No other image could portray better the megalomania of this person.

 

 

 

Inside the Trump Tower

 

 

The Trump Tower is located near Central Park, another jewel of a city, whose vulnerability to natural or other disasters I felt so strongly.

 

 

 

 

David, Patty and Thomas underneath an arch in Central Park near the Zoo

 

 

 

The Lake

 

 

 

 

 

 

New York recovered after 9/11. On the place of the tragic event, impressive and very touching memorial sites where erected. In two large, rectangular pits of black marble, water splashes down into a black pool of water which flows deeper down into a black rectangular ditch.  The blackness and down movement of the memorial sites is posed in opposition to a building in the form of a white bird lifting its wings to take off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside the Bird Building with access to trains and metro stations

 

 

Walking on the Brooklyn Bridge and on the Sky Walk (a former High Line for traffic transformed into a public park) showed, that practical and functional buildings can uplift the human spirit by their beauty.

 

 

 

My daughter Anna-Sophie and I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking from the sky down to Lower Manhattan, Battery Park and the Statue of Liberty was truly a special experience. Knowing that millions of immigrants came in the past with all their hopes for a better future to New York and first saw the Statue of Liberty as a sign of their longing for freedom, was very  touching.

 

 

 

 

 

Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island

 

 

 

 

Midtown Manhattan with Central Park

 

 

In New York, I walked many miles. They included rests in cosy cafes, strolls through calm and peaceful neighbourhoods with little parks in between and walks along the Hudson River. Being with family and friends was crucial for feeling connected and enjoying the beauty.

gwwien
gwwienhttps://simplyjustwalking.com
Born and raised in a village along the Danube in Austria, Traude Wild soon ventured out into the world. After a two-year program for tourism in Klesheim/Salzburg, she spent nearly a year in South Africa and Namibia. By returning back to Austria, she acquired a Master of Economics at the University of Vienna. After moving to the United States with her four children, she studied Art History at Arizona State University and stayed in the United States for fourteen years. Here, she was teaching Art History in several Universities like Webster University and University of Missouri-St. Louis. Now, she lives partially in Arizona and Vienna and works together with her husband for the University of South-Carolina, Moore School of business as Adjunct Professor organising and leading Study tours in Central Europe. She also teaches at the Sigmund Freud University in Vienna. Since 1999, she is practicing Zen meditation in the lineage of Katagiri Roshi. She loves to hike and to write and is a student of Natalie Goldberg. During her often many weeks long hikes she brings her awareness into the Here and Now, describing her experiences in an authentic way. She loves to walk pilgrimages. The longest hike so far was the 1,400 km long 88 Temple pilgrimage in Shikoku, Japan in 2016.

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Comments

  1. beautiful photos. One of my friends from high school was an active volunteer/photographer for promoting the High Line there and showcasing its beauty. She has a personal story to tell of a kind of “creepy” encounter she had with the Donald on a very personal level there…..but ….enough said on that. Have fun.

  2. I loved seeing NYC through your eyes! It was a very special treat to share our trip with you and David. Your photos are great and wonderful memories.
    love and hugs,
    Patty

    • Patty, New York became so special because Thomas and you showed us your New York!
      You were leading us to the best and most interesting places! Thanks again!
      Love, Traude

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