Camino Primitivo, Day 14

 MELIDE – RAS

 

Already in early morning, masses of pilgrims where pushing forward toward Santiago. I had to let go of the solitude of the past two weeks. But a different energy replaced the silence and peacefulness – it was the energy of many joyful, openhearted, happy people. The pilgrims came from all over the world. I was very surprised to see so many Asian people, especially Koreans. Five years ago, I met only one Asian, a Japanese pilgrim.

 

 

Leaving Melide in the early morning
Leaving Melide in the early morning

 

 

Morning light on a chapel in Melide
Morning light on a chapel in Melide

 

 

 

Entrance portal of the Romanesque church Santa Maria
Entrance portal of the Romanesque church Santa Maria

 

At an old, public washing place, I saw for the first time ever somebody using one. This woman had a lot of fun washing her cloth.

 

 

IMG_2505

 

 

The typical forests in Galicia are Eucalyptus forests, a tree imported from Australia. Although they are not good for the environment, especially because they replaced the native trees, walking through an Eucalyptus forest when the mist is dissolving the contours of the trees is a very nice experience.

 

 

IMG_2514

 

 

This day, I met Austrians for the first time – Verena and Andreas from Styria. It is their profession to document their treks with photos and films and talk about them at home.

 

 

IMG_2528

 

 

On the Camino Frances, there are many restaurants, cafes, and bars. Since the last 5 years when I was there, many new, fancy places have popped up. They did not fit into the image of the Camino I carried in my mind.

 

 

New cafe
New cafe

 

Although the Camino provides a training place to wind down, to trust the Way and to trust that everything is perfect that is happening right now, many pilgrims are not able to step into this mindset. Now, their competitiveness is focused on getting into the best albergue and getting there early enough for a space. In the photo down below, already at noon a huge line of people is sitting in front of the albergue waiting to get a bed for the night.

 

 

Albergue in Arzúa
Albergue in Arzúa

 

 

One of many fountains with fresh drinking water
One of many fountains with fresh drinking water

 

Now, many people do not carry their heavy backpack, but only a day bag. They use a special service to transport their bag to the next albergue.

 

 

IMG_2580

 

 

 

Two students from South Carolina
Two students from South Carolina

 

The whole day, I had to walk slowly. My right knee was revolting and hurting. I had to take a pain pill to be able to walk. Towards the evening, when I was limping through the woods, an even more limping old man came towards me. He was a returning pilgrim walking back to his home in Slowenia. He told me that he went on this pilgrimage for his friend, who was killed in the war. I gave him a donation, which he gladly accepted.

 

 

IMG_2610

 

 

 

Slowenian pilgrim
Slowenian pilgrim

 

 

One of many messages on the Camino
One of many messages on the Camino

 

 

IMG_2618

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gwwien
gwwienhttps://simplyjustwalking.com
Born and raised in a village along the Danube in Austria, Traude Wild soon ventured out into the world. After a two-year program for tourism in Klesheim/Salzburg, she spent nearly a year in South Africa and Namibia. By returning back to Austria, she acquired a Master of Economics at the University of Vienna. After moving to the United States with her four children, she studied Art History at Arizona State University and stayed in the United States for fourteen years. Here, she was teaching Art History in several Universities like Webster University and University of Missouri-St. Louis. Now, she lives partially in Arizona and Vienna and works together with her husband for the University of South-Carolina, Moore School of business as Adjunct Professor organising and leading Study tours in Central Europe. She also teaches at the Sigmund Freud University in Vienna. Since 1999, she is practicing Zen meditation in the lineage of Katagiri Roshi. She loves to hike and to write and is a student of Natalie Goldberg. During her often many weeks long hikes she brings her awareness into the Here and Now, describing her experiences in an authentic way. She loves to walk pilgrimages. The longest hike so far was the 1,400 km long 88 Temple pilgrimage in Shikoku, Japan in 2016.

Related Stories

spot_img

Discover

Camino Primitivo, Day 20

 LIRES – MUXIA   Until the evening, heavy mist covered the coastline to Muxia. I was...

Camino Primitivo, Day 19

FISTERRE –LIRES   It was hard to leave the albergue this morning. I was very tempted...

Camino Primitivo, Day 18

 SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA – FISTERRE   In Celtic times and even before, Cape Finisterre was considered...

Camino Primitivo, Day 16 /17

 MONTE DO GOZO – SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA   The history of Santiago de Compostela is closely...

Camino Primitivo, Day 15

 RAS – MONTE DEL GOZO   Although my knee wanted a rest, I did not want...

Camino Primitivo, Day 13

SAN ROMÁN DE RETORTA – MELIDE   The beauty and solitude of the Camino Primitivo was...

Popular Categories

Comments

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Discover more from Simply.Just.Walking

Subscribe now to keep reading and get access to the full archive.

Continue reading