img_2071Wadi Rum is located at the southern part of Jordan near the Red Sea.  It is famous for its magnificent desert landscape with red rock formations and narrow canyons called Siqs. Over 30 000 petroglyphs decorate the red sandstone cliffs, a place inhabited by humans since prehistoric times. About 5000 Bedouins live now in this area, sharing their traditional life with the tourists visiting their camps.

 

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Instead of hiking, we used a 4WD Toyota Pick up Truck to discover the area. A 25 year old Bedouin was driving it.  It was an adventure by itself, as he was driving through the deep, red sand with an incredible speed.

 

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Wadi Rum is blessed with many wells and water holes in the rocks, which makes life in the extreme summer heat  possible.

 

img_9447Entrance of a narrow Siq in Wadi Rum

Walking through deep sand is like walking through deep snow – slow and exhausting.  It was great to have tea every so often  in the Bedouine tents.

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This photo is of Mohammed Mutlak Camp, where we stayed overnight. Despite sitting with the Bedouines beside the fire pit and smoking Shisha, we ate the traditional Bedouine barbecue called zerb. It is food cooked in an oven buried in sand.

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Zarb, the traditional Bedouine food.

The next morning, I decided to ride on a camel back to the village. It was supposed to be a 2 hour ride. One of the camels just recently won  the race of all the camels in Wadi Rum.

 

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The race camel was supposed to stay in the camp, but the group of camels did not want to be separated. Two strong men where holding the camel back when the little boy (maybe  10 years old) and I were riding out of the camp. Only after several meters, my camel made a wild jump and threw me out of the saddle.  I was falling into the soft sand,  just an inch away from a large rock. I was increadible thankful for that soft landing.