SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA – FISTERRE

 

In Celtic times and even before, Cape Finisterre was considered the “end of the world” and a major cultic place. Often the medieval pilgrims continued their pilgrimage to Cape Finisterre. At the coast, they collected the scallop as evidence that they had walked the entire Camino to the end of the world. Five years ago, I walked that extra 54 miles with my daughter. This time I only hiked the last eight miles to Fisterre.

 

 

People helping a pilgrim to find the way

People helping a pilgrim to find the way

 

 

 

More old stone walls

More old stone walls

 

 

Soon I walked along the coast and had a spectacular view to Cap Finisterre and the town Fisterre.

 

 

View of the “end of the world”

View of the “end of the world”

 

 

Typical Galician stone cross

Typical Galician stone cross

 

I chose to stay at the albergue Do Sol. It was the same place I stayed in five years ago. It had not lost its charm and warmth.

 

 

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One of many writings in the albergue

One of many writings in the albergue

 

Cape Finisterre is half an hour walk away from town. Many pilgrims go there to watch the sunset. After two weeks of bad weather, the atmosphere was clear and brilliant. The sun was visible until it disappeared at the horizon. It looked as if it was sinking into the ocean.Everybody was watching it in silence.

 

Until recently, it was a tradition to burn a piece of clothing or shoes near the light tower. However, after the whole hill caught fire one time, the tradition was forbidden, but not everybody is following this law – I saw the leftovers of some recently burned shoes.

 

 

Light tower

Light tower

 

 

Granite boulders on the Cape

Granite boulders on the Cape

 

 

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